Texas Conservatives Win Vote on Textbook Standards

After three days of turbulent meetings, the Texas Board of Education on Friday approved a social studies curriculum that will put a conservative stamp on history and economics textbooks, stressing the superiority of American capitalism, questioning the Founding Fathers’ commitment to a purely secular government and presenting Republican political philosophies in a more positive light. Full Story »

Posted by Kaizar Campwala - via Siva Vaidhyanathan, Google News (U.S.), Slatest, New York Times (Most Emailed), Kaizar Campwala (t), Donica Mensing (t), Gil Sharon (t), Joey Baker (f), Kaizar Campwala (f), Fabrice Florin (f), Jon Mitchell (f), Subramanya Sastry (f), Jason Samfield (f)
Tags Help
Subjects: U.S., Education
Stats Help
# Diggs: 71 (as of 2010-03-13)
Editorial Help
Posted by: Posted by Kaizar Campwala - Mar 12, 2010 - 12:14 PM PST
Content Type: Article
Edit Lock: This story can be edited
Edited by: Terry Gamble - Mar 13, 2010 - 7:15 AM PST
Jon Mitchell
4.2
by Jon Mitchell - Mar. 19, 2010

McKinley provides the facts on the ground, with plenty of background, without losing objectivity. For such a divisive story, it's impressive to me that McKinley did such a good job of letting the facts speak for themselves.

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Jack Dinkmeyer
4.2
by Jack Dinkmeyer - Mar. 19, 2010

Excellent, objective story about an extremely emotionally charge issue. There is sweeping across the land an emotional tidal wave of carefully scripted, carefully managed, religiously motivated, anti-science, anti-intellectual insurrection of propaganda intended to rewrite and obscure scientific knowledge and historical facts in favor of the right-wing fringe mantra.

In the Constitution there is no mention of church-state separation. There is no mention of Jesus, either.

“They are going overboard, they are not experts, they are not historians,” she said. “They are rewriting history, not only of Texas but of the United States and the ... More »

See Full Review » (14 answers)
Terry Gamble
4.4
by Terry Gamble - Mar. 13, 2010

The story includes the points of view of many of the members on the school board. The story could actually be a smaller part of a larger discussion about ideology and pedagogy. The story is a profound comment on the power of a small group to influence the way information is disseminated, with possible reverberations into future generations. Perhaps the most striking fact is that, because one of the board members disagrees with the notion of separation of church and state, Thomas Jefferson was cut from a list of figures whose writings influenced the concept of liberty and democracy.

I recommend reading THE SCIENCE OF LIBERTY by Timothy Ferris.

See Full Review » (12 answers)
Chris Finnie
4.9
by Chris Finnie - Mar. 13, 2010

I appreciate it that Mr. McKinley and the Times followed up on this important story.

Yesterday, I wrote board-member Bradley to point out that the First Amendment, a part of the Constitution since the Bill of Rights was approved by 3/4 of the states in 1791, provided the constitutional language he seeks on the separation of church and state. Needless to say, I have not received a response to my email. Nor do I expect to. I requested he donate the promised $1,000 to the California Democratic Party. I don't expect that either.

See Full Review » (12 answers)
Joel Kulenkamp
4.5
by Joel Kulenkamp - Mar. 19, 2010

This sheds a light on one of the biggest battles in the US cultural arena.

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Dwight Rousu
4.2
by Dwight Rousu - Mar. 19, 2010

The story notes the extreme right wing nut wing of the right wing successfully taking over the board of education and rewriting civics and history from a position of ignorance and power.

Don't let your children grow up to be foxboys.

See Full Review » (13 answers)
Lynn R. Willis
4.6
by Lynn R. Willis - Mar. 14, 2010

This piece presents an objective and concise account of the seemingly endless struggle, this time taking place in Texas, to determine whose biases get passed to future generations in the guise of objective education. The quotes from the members of the school board speak for themselves.

Here's one reason not to let public education in Texas educate your kids...

See Full Review » (20 answers)
William Hughes-Games
5.0
by William Hughes-Games - Mar. 14, 2010

A very clear picture of what is happening in Texas, chilling in its lack of commentary. Makes the hair stand up on the back of your neck.

Am I correct that the same people who want to change history are the ones pushing for the teaching of intelligent design. Has anyone polled them to see if they also believe that the world was created some 6000 years ago. Think in our recent history who burnt books. This is no less insidious.

See Full Review » (5 answers)
Kaizar Campwala
4.0
by Kaizar Campwala - Mar. 19, 2010

The Times gives many examples of the changes proposed, with explanation.

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Robert B. Elliott
4.7
by Robert B. Elliott - Mar. 14, 2010

This is great journalism, however I don't recommend it for any thinking person because it terrifies me & turns my stomach. It is very frightening to see that there are so many people in such positions who refuse to accept reality & who insist, against overwhelming evidence to the contrary, that mythology & cult beliefs should be foisted on young people in public schools.

See Full Review » (6 answers)

Comments on this story Help (BETA)

NT Rating | My Rating

Ratings

4.4

Good
from 12 reviews (61% confidence)
Quality
4.4
Facts
4.7
Fairness
4.5
Information
5.0
Insight
5.0
Sourcing
4.2
Style
4.2
Accuracy
4.5
Balance
4.0
Context
4.1
Depth
4.2
Enterprise
4.2
Expertise
3.5
Originality
4.0
Relevance
4.9
Transparency
4.0
Responsibility
5.0
Popularity
4.5
Recommendation
4.5
Credibility
4.3
# Reviews
5.0
# Views
5.0
# Likes
3.0
# Emails
3.0
More
How our ratings work »

Topics

(See these related stories.)

Links Help

  • Conservatives put stamp on Texas textbooks Queued

    The social studies changes approved by the Texas Board of Education will have a broad influence because the state is one of the nation?s largest buyers of textbooks. ...
  • How Christian Were the Founders?

    Conservative activists on the Texas Board of Education say that the authors of the Constitution intended the United States to be a Christian nation. And they want America’s ...
    Posted by Kaizar Campwala
  • PaleoTexans Control US Textbooks Queued

    () on McLeroy is a balding, paunchy man with a thick broom-handle mustache who lives in a rambling two-story brick home in a suburb near Bryan, Texas. When he greeted me at the ...
  • What's the matter with Kansas?: how conservatives won the heart of America Pending

    Posted by Doug Greer
  • Bill Maher: New Rule: Let's Not Fire the Teachers When Students Don't Learn -- Let's Fire the Parents

    Last week, President Obama defended the firing of every single teacher in a struggling high school in a poor Rhode Island neighborhood. But according to all the studies, it ...
    Posted by Chris Finnie
  • Texas Education Board Approves Conservative Curriculum Changes By Far-Right

    Decisions by the board – made up of lawyers, a dentist and a weekly newspaper publisher among others – can affect textbook content nationwide because Texas is one of ...
    Posted by Dwight Rousu