Selling You on Facebook

Many popular Facebook apps obtain sensitive information about users—and users' friends—so don't be surprised if details about your religious, political and even sexual preferences start popping up in unexpected places. Full Story »

Posted by Fabrice Florin - via Dave Winer, Columbia Journalism Review, Google News (Sci/Tech), Wall Street Journal (Most Emailed)
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Posted by: Posted by Fabrice Florin - Apr 7, 2012 - 6:37 AM PDT
Content Type: Article
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Sirajul Islam
3.9
by Sirajul Islam - Apr. 8, 2012

A detail article on online privacy, esp. on facebook. There are interactives, video etc. While the story is highly informative, I found the video similar to what the story said. I enjoyed reading the article...

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Danny Franks
3.9
by Danny Franks - Jan. 9, 2013

The piece does a great job of introducing a new side to arguably one of the most popular topics on the web, Facebook. It is topical, because most everyone interacts on Facebook in some way shape or form. It has impact because everyone has a personal stake in their information, and how these companies are using it. Many people may not know that their information is being used and therefore the element of surprise may be the best part of the story

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Alexandra Hawayek
4.0
by Alexandra Hawayek - May. 24, 2012

Yes, this article explains a prevalent issue that not many people have sufficient knowledge on.

Apps are gateways, and when you buy an app, there is a strong chance that you are supplying its developers with one of the most coveted commodities in today’s ... More »

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Fabrice Florin
3.5
by Fabrice Florin - Apr. 8, 2012
See Full Review » (1 answer)
Alex Gutierrez
3.5
by Alex Gutierrez - Apr. 11, 2012

I feel that this article is science and technology worthy because of the technology it focuses on. It conveys how we use technology everywhere and how people interact more on Facebook than in other circumstances. We use facebook a lot to socialize with others and our friends, however, we do not take into account all the apps that are available to us. We might use games apps or other apps to waste time or find something useful but we have to give up some personal information first. This article has different sides of the story and has evidence to prove its point that apps also come with ads. It interviews users and professionals and other companies.

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Steven Su
4.3
by Steven Su - Jan. 8, 2013

This article describes the way that the privacy of users online can be abused and cites examples of controversial apps and the popular website Facebook. Specific persons were mentioned and quoted. The content itself clearly states the potential problem, effects it may have on the general public, and is current. WSJ shows ways in which privacy rules and laws can be circumvented. The article ends with an open-ended and unasked question: What should we do about this?

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Joseph Kerwin
3.8
by Joseph Kerwin - Apr. 9, 2012

This piece probably generates surprise (more in an older generation) and a feeling of irritation in any technology user. As data gathering is an ongoing topic, this article holds a good amount of relevance and timeliness, but this topic is not original. This practice of data-gathering is not a new idea; this article informs readers the newer, more efficient ways our information is being gathered. While a bit creepy, there is little emotional effect of this piece. As far as proximity, ... More »

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