Cameron, Coulson and the press: The irony of the prime minister's predicament

Almost all prime ministers have a kind of moral half-life; their personal credibility starts off strong and then declines incrementally in office as they are buffeted by scandals and misjudgements. Gordon Brown is the only recent example of a prime minister who lost his moral authority in one go; the snap election fiasco in effect doomed his premiership after just a few months in office.

I believe that, although Coulson-gate is the gravest moment ... Full Story »

Posted by Fabrice Florin - via Jaimey Perham (t), Salvador Sala (t), David Wardell (t), Saed Abu Hmud (t), Gian Antelles (t), Jason Samfield (t), John Rueschenberg (t), Wil Kristin (t)
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Posted by: Posted by Fabrice Florin - Jul 10, 2011 - 2:00 AM PDT
Content Type: Article
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Chris Finnie
2.8
by Chris Finnie - Jul. 10, 2011

I read this because my experience is that The Economist is a pretty keen observer of the British political scene and I've been following this story. Had I not been, I would not have had the background to know what they were talking about. So it falls short in that area. The insight also seems fairly shallow. And, as the story says, only time will tell whether they are right. So it's not even very bold as an opinion piece.

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Fabrice Florin
3.5
by Fabrice Florin - Jul. 10, 2011
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