There Is No Male-Female Wage Gap

Recent studies have shown that the wage gap shrinks—or even reverses—when relevant factors are taken into account and comparisons are made between men and women in similar circumstances. In a 2010 study of single, childless urban workers between the ages of 22 and 30, the research firm Reach Advisors found that women earned an average of 8% more than their male counterparts. Given that women are outpacing men in educational attainment, and that our ... Full Story »

Posted by Kelly Garrett - via Fair Spin (Right), Memeorandum, Wall Street Journal (Most Emailed), AllTop, Wall Street Journal (Opinion)
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Kelly Garrett
3.5
by Kelly Garrett - Apr. 13, 2011

The author of this opinion piece makes the controversial claim that men and women are on equal footing in the job market. Her argument has two parts. First, the recession has hit men harder than women because female-dominated industries have been more insulated from its effects. Second, men and women earn equal pay for equal work. That is, the fact that women earn less than men on average is a consequence of their working fewer hours and choosing less difficult, more rewarding work--not because of discrimination. The latter claim appears to be a misinterpretation of the study cited, though. This is an opinion piece, so it should come as no surprise that the evidence is carefully selected to make the point, and ... More »

This argument really turns on the claim that women make more than men "when relevant factors are taken into account". There are many studies suggesting that this is not the case, and focusing on a single analysis of census data published by a research firm (and thus not peer-reviewed) is deceptive. Furthermore, an interview with the author of that study suggests that the results are misrepresented here: "When we talk about young women out-earning men, we are talking about ... More »

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Gary Clark
2.8
by Gary Clark - Apr. 15, 2011

The information is selected for the point of view, but there are omissions or assumptions not accounted for. She does not show that women choose less well paying jobs but that they predominate in them; The prejudice in male-dominated sectors is well documented. Even in non-physical, highly educated professions in academia, business executive levels and medicine, the "glass ceiling" prevails. NOTE ON SOURCE; this organization is a right wing think-tank that was allied with Americans For Prosperity, a Koch Industries creation. The IWF is anti-gender equity (Title X program and affirmative action). Critical papers by university professors have called their work "JUNK SCIENCE".

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Melissa Herchakowski
4.0
by Melissa Herchakowski - Apr. 18, 2011

This is really good journalism because the article is full of rich information on the topic. There are also many interesting statistics comparing employment of men and women. It is interesting how it also related to the economy today.

It was a very factual unbiased article that taught me a lot. I never realized that women tend to gravitate to more stable jobs and men tend to work more outside and are risk takers. I really enjoyed reading this article.

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Dwight Rousu
1.9
by Dwight Rousu - Apr. 14, 2011

Most of the statistics alluded to seemed carefully selected to support a viewpoint. Categories chosen for making comparisons are vague and of the author's choosing, presumably to also support a preconceived point of view. I have trouble believing anything in this opinion.

Much of any improvement in women's working conditions and pay are the result of the democracy of unions working to balance bargaining power of women and individuals when dealing with huge corporate employers who are forced by law to maximize short term profits. The current reactionary wing attacks upon unions endanger any progress that might have been made.

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Lily Duffy
4.6
by Lily Duffy - Apr. 13, 2011

This is good journalism because Lukas uses lots of facts and figures from credible sources to shed light on a claim that many have regarded as an undisputed truth for years. She highlights major discrepancies to clearly explain why she believes that the male-female wage gap is essentially non-existent. It also doesn't hurt that she herself is a woman, which acts as a sort of counter-bias. Overall, a very interesting and well-done opinion piece.

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Olivia Stephens
4.2
by Olivia Stephens - Apr. 27, 2011

Yes, there are a lot of facts used and reliable, credible sources.

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Roland F. Hirsch
4.4
by Roland F. Hirsch - Apr. 13, 2011

This opinion piece is excellent journalism. The author has a point to make, but she makes it through facts, for which the sources are cited. The writing style is non-ideological and the emphasis is on the real situation rather than claims by advocacy groups. Well written.

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Moupia Das
3.8
by Moupia Das - Apr. 16, 2011

This is a very well-written article. Not only does the writer discuss the issue at hand but she also looks into the reasons for the changes in the wage gap. It is interesting to see that many factors are overlooked when attempting to understand the wage gap. Though men take on less flexible jobs and work longer hours, more younger men are not looking for employment at the rates that young women are. Though not having a wage gap is ideal, this is creating an issue among men and women given the societal expectations of both groups.

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Walter Cox
4.2
by Walter Cox - Apr. 13, 2011
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Sara Lindemann
3.9
by Sara Lindemann - Apr. 13, 2011

I think this is good journalism because it is well written, relevent because it relates to the current economy, and it is informative for both men and women. It is thoroughly researched because it displays good detail that relates to the topic.

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Sherry Wing
4.4
by Sherry Wing - Apr. 13, 2011

I would consider this good journalism. I've read an article similar to this one before, so I had prior knowledge, but I bet a lot of people reading this article would be surprised to learn about the reasons for the current, almost equal, unemployment rate between the two sexes and some of the reasons why women are paid less than men. I would definitely recommend this story because it focuses on a very current issue, the recession, and the effects of that issue on employment, which many are concerned about today. I thought it was interesting that the author said that, "...many American women wish...they weren't the primary earners for their families." I find that to be interesting, but I wonder how true that really is.

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Scott P Johnson
by Scott P Johnson - Apr. 13, 2011

This is good jouornalism because it offers both side of the story

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    When we talk about young women out-earning men, we are talking about averages. "It does not mean that a woman holding the same job and the same degree out-earns men," he said. ...
    Posted by Kelly Garrett
  • Presidential Proclamation--National Equal Pay Day Pending

    Posted by Kelly Garrett