U.S. has highest bipolar rate in 11-nation study

About 2.4% of people around the world have had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder at some point in their lifetime, according to the first comprehensive international figures on the topic. Full Story »

Posted by Lauren Garcia - via Tshiung Han See (t), Mayel de Borniol (t), Jeremy Caplan (t)
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Subjects: U.S., Sci/Tech, Health
Topics: Psychology
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# Tweets: 116 (as of 2011-04-09)
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Posted by: Posted by Lauren Garcia - Mar 7, 2011 - 10:15 PM PST
Content Type: Article
Edit Lock: This story can be edited
Edited by: Fabrice Florin - Feb 21, 2012 - 12:06 AM PST

Reviews

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Mauricio Villa
4.0
by Mauricio Villa - Mar. 10, 2011

This article about health coverage I believe goes upstream since it informs the reader on why people have mental disorders and bipolar diseases. However, this article does not list solutions on what could be done in order to prevent this disease that 4.4% of Americans have. Furthermore, the author of this piece could have further gone upstream and discovered why people are not getting their bipolar diseases treated. He could have kept going upstream by researching if transportation, lack of education, or the language barrier has a correlation with individuals not seeking out for care.

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Julia Hirt
3.9
by Julia Hirt - Feb. 21, 2012

I believe this article on bipolar disorder across different nations frames the disease as a societal responsibility. It highlights the fact that the United States has a much higher lifetime rate of bipolar disorder compared with other nations where the stigma of psychological disease is very high. The article takes on a societal level especially when it discusses stigma; doctors across nations conclude that they know how to diagnose bipolar disorder but that many individuals are reluctant to seek out psychiatric help because mental illness is frowned upon. I think this article seeks to create awareness across societies to show individuals suffering with bipolar disorder that they should look for support. The article could be ... More »

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Drew Kells
3.5
by Drew Kells - Mar. 10, 2011

This article does a good job of looking at bipolar disorder and the study conducted on it, but what it fails to do is determine the context and importance of what the disease means to the rest of society. It is well written and supported with relevant expertise, but the story could greatly have benefited with a source that has been effected by bipolar disorder and how the study will effect those who currently have the disease. The issue was pushed upstream somewhat, but the lack of expressing what problems bipolar disorder had previously created did not allow the given solutions to have much meaning.

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Brianna Tulp
3.7
by Brianna Tulp - Apr. 1, 2011

I enjoyed reading the article. I wish there was mention of the name of the study in the lead of the article. I also wish there was more of an explanation of what the study tested and how they did so. It's relevant since many people are living with bipolar disorders.

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Jessica Yrani
3.7
by Jessica Yrani - Jan. 17, 2012

The article gives possible cultural reasons for the high rate of bipolar disorder in the US. It suggests that people there is a lower stigma in the US, resulting in diagnosis of a lot more cases. The lack of the social structure and family background in the US can be a cause of high bipolar disorder; moreover, the immigrants to the US are the entrepreneur type who are willing to take risks.

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Lauren Garcia
4.0
by Lauren Garcia - Mar. 7, 2011

Although this article is informative and provides in-depth examples and information regarding bipolar disorder specifically in the United States, there are some stereotypes as well. Although it is not written necessarily as a stereotype but more an unconscious one, the portion of the article that attempts to explain the higher overall prevalence of bipolar disorder in the U.S. conveys a sense of superiority. The article cites Sara Bodner's response as she said one of the reasons ... More »

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Mirella Villalpando
3.9
by Mirella Villalpando - Jan. 16, 2012

This article showed several characteristics of good journalism. The article's presentation of its findings on the issue of interest was done so in a manner not appearing to be biased. It also presented relevant theories as to what the cause of the issue could have stemmed from and included statements appearing to be well sourced. It presented background information as to what the study consisted of, identified and defined what the study's purpose was, noted the structure of how the study was conducted, and presented the guidelines of what was identified as bipolar to ensure thoroughness. The issue I found with the article was that it lacked entrepreneurship. Although it presented some of the possible reasons for the unequal ... More »

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Mariah Adcox
4.0
by Mariah Adcox - Jan. 16, 2012

This article frames health as a societal responsibility. I make this claim primarily based on the fact that the article discusses why people in the U.S. have a higher instance of bipolar disorder, not because of their genetic makeup, but because of the cultural instances that may cause this statistic. For example, the author suggests that there is a negative stigma associated with this disorder in many countries, whereas American society is acutely aware of psychiatric disorders, and much more comfortable talking about them. However, it is important to keep in mind the dangers of attributing health trends to cultural differences, as Paul Farmer points out in his book Infections and Inequalities: The Modern Plagues. Both medical ... More »

See Full Review » (11 answers)

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