The Art of the Political Comeback

How far can a major political party fall?

It’s a question Republicans seem determined to test these days. The party is shut out of power in the White House. In Congress, the Democrats now have enough votes to block a filibuster. Approval ratings for the Republican Party are at near-record lows. Worse still, at a time when Republicans are yearning for someone to lead them back to power, the party’s next generation of stars is drawing precisely ... Full Story »

Posted by Leo Romero
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Subjects: Politics
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Posted by: Posted by Leo Romero - Jul 12, 2009 - 9:37 AM PDT
Content Type: Article
Edit Lock: This story can be edited
Edited by: Derek Hawkins - Jul 12, 2009 - 10:52 PM PDT
Shawn Powers
3.4
by Shawn Powers - Jul. 14, 2009

I'm not really sure what this story adds to the discourse regarding political parties and American politics today. It does a fine job of laying out the current state of the Republican party, and adds a bit of historical context to it, but that is all. I think that the conversation re: demographics could be expanded. How will the growing Latino population shape both political parties? Perhaps a quote or two from a representative of that community would be helpful. Ditto with the gay rights discussion. Andrew Sullivan would be a great person to chime in on the issue. Also lacking is a discussion of how new media technologies are impacting political parties and politics in general.

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Dwight Rousu
2.2
by Dwight Rousu - Jul. 14, 2009

The story neglects the influence of big money from business interests that has financed campaigns with bad ideas but photogenic slick talkers that could be sold with enough advertizing. The big money tends to follow those who look like they could win.

Campaign financing reform via publicly elected campaigns would boost statesmanship rather than political fundraisers and marketing.

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Leo Romero
3.0
by Leo Romero - Jul. 12, 2009
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Derek Hawkins
4.0
by Derek Hawkins - Jul. 13, 2009

Political comebacks tend to come in two forms. The first is when a party stumbles back into power because of the mistakes by the other side. A classic instance came in ... More »

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William Owney
3.2
by William Owney - Jul. 14, 2009

This meta view of contemporary American politics appears to be predominantly objective and in generally acceptable context. It offers original analysis and does not present any overt bias. It is top-drawer journalism.

Nagourney's analysis rests on a concept for which he is the sole source: The idea that there are two types of comebacks. He then use that predicate without buttress to classify historic events. It leads to the obvious question, "Says who?" On one hand, it would be pedantic and digressive to launch a detailed, explicit examination of the nature of political comebacks; one the other, it would be nice to have a reason to believe that it is sufficient to have Mr. Nagourney as the sole ... More »

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