Obesity epidemic hits the diaper set?

WALNUT CREEK, Calif. — Ten years ago, pediatrician Gary Bean began noticing a trend in his Oakland, Calif., practice. Babies were increasingly bigger, and they weren't thinning out by the time they were crawling and walking. Toddlers came to appoin Full Story »

Posted by Katie Stoiber - via Seattle Times

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Gabriela Mena
4.0
by Gabriela Mena - Jan. 27, 2011

This article's frame of responsibility is both individual and societal: the child's guardian/caretaker must control how much an infant or child consumes as they grow, influencing and shaping life-long eating habits, and society must create and maintain a supportive environment that promotes healthy eating. On the individual level, readers (with young children) realize the severity of poor eating habits and their consequences, probably feeling more compelled to work towards a solution within their own families. On the societal level, as a community we realize the extent and prevalence of obesity in our society. If babies are becoming overweight and at risk for obesity before they can even feed themselves, there is something very, very wrong with our health habits as a society. Children learn from society: is this what we really want them to embody as acceptable and healthy? The frame of responsibility does matter when it comes to social determinants: a family living on food stamps and in subsidized housing may not be able to provide fresh fruits and vegetables for their children on a regular basis. Not everyone has received equal amounts of education, or health education, nor does everyone receive equal income. Looking at various cases in class, we already know that those determinants usually affect poor ethnic groups more negatively than their white, affluent counterparts. Placed in a harder socioeconomic predicament, the poorer ethnic community is more likely resort to unhealthy habits that can be passed down to younger generations.

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