Circumcision helps stop cancer-causing virus, study finds

Researchers have documented yet another health benefit for circumcision, which can protect men against the AIDS virus, saying it can protect their wives and girlfriends from a virus that causes cervical cancer. Full Story »

Posted by Sally Lehrman - via LA Times (Most Emailed)
Tags Help
Subjects: Health
Editorial Help
Posted by: Posted by Sally Lehrman - Jan 8, 2011 - 10:18 AM PST
Content Type: Article
Edit Lock: This story can be edited
Edited by: Sally Lehrman - Jan 9, 2011 - 2:31 PM PST

Reviews

Show All | Notes | Comments | Quotes | Links
Drew Kells
4.0
by Drew Kells - Jan. 27, 2011

This is great journalism because of how much it covers with such concise writing. The author tells the news story, backs it up with quotes and statistics, and ties it in to the overall bigger picture of how it relates to society. One thing that I found really interesting in the article was that it identifies the health disparities of geography that we have talked about in class as it discusses how vaccines against HPV are not available to women in developing countries. Science and technology has readily made vaccines for these diseases, but society has failed to figure out the proper way to equally distribute the vaccines to poorer countries around the world. I believe the frame of responsibility for this issue is both ... More »

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Gabriela Mena
3.6
by Gabriela Mena - Jan. 11, 2011

The male's parents and the society's culture are responsible for circumcising the males. The science may encourage male circumcision, but if the society and its culture does not embrace circumcision, they are not likely to follow through with it. The article is not explicit as to whether or not these men were circumcised as infants or as adults, but if they were adults at the time of the circumcision, then the males themselves can be added to those responsible for good health and ... More »

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Anton Lorenzo V. Avancena
3.6
by Anton Lorenzo V. Avancena - Feb. 22, 2011

Individual responsibility is the frame used in this article. Instead of women being solely responsible for their reproductive health, men can now take a more active role in preventing diseases that the human papilloma virus (HPV) causes. As responsible partners or spouses, men can prevent cervical cancer, genital warts, and cancers of the penis, anus, and neck by having themselves circumcised. This is in addition to what the article mentioned about circumcision being a preventative measure for HIV contraction. Circumcision, however isProxy-Connection: keep-alive Cache-Control: max-age=0 ersonal choice. Although some cultures and religions prescribe circumcision for its male members, whether an adult will have himself ... More »

Circumcision has long been thought to have no valuable medical basis (http://www.latimes.com/health/hw-hw142449-1,0,2665679.story). However, recent studies sponsored by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Gates Foundation have shown that male circumcision lowers the transmission of AIDS by about 60% (http://www.latimes.com/health/sns-health-men-africa-circumcision-campaigns,0,7346329.story). Since then, various governments and non-profit groups have pushed for mass ... More »

See Full Review » (20 answers)
Catherine Nally
4.0
by Catherine Nally - Jan. 11, 2011

It seems to me that both the influence of society and the thoughts of ones parents are the two main forces which carry the burden of responsibility for good health. This article interested me because in the past I'd only heard that there was NO medical reason to circumcise a man; the reasons were usually cultural, religious, or brought about by societal ideas of what was normal. After reading this article I'm prone to believe that there may be some truth to the whole idea of fewer ... More »

See Full Review » (4 answers)
Trisha Kajioka
4.0
by Trisha Kajioka - Jan. 10, 2011

I found this article very interesting. I had never heard this theory of circumcision helping the prevention of some viruses. The science of it makes sense but this article does not fully convince me. After reading it I felt like some of the data such as, 27.8 percent of circumcised men had HPV infections whereas 38.7 percent of uncircumcised men had HPV, was a coincidence. The parents of males hold the responsibility for healthy disease free people because the parents are usually ... More »

See Full Review » (4 answers)
Tani Pozirekides
4.0
by Tani Pozirekides - Jan. 11, 2011

In this article regarding how circumcision can lead to decreased contractions of HPV, AIDS, and other diseases in both men as well as their long-term sexual partners, the party responsible for bearing the burden of good health would be those willing to become circumcised. CIrcumcision is not only for the health benefits of those undergoing the surgery, but for their sexual partners as well, It is noted in the study that "wives and girlfriends of circumcised men had a 28% lower rate ... More »

See Full Review » (4 answers)
Vanessa Gamino
3.8
by Vanessa Gamino - Feb. 22, 2011

This article is effective in connecting science with technology and society. The medical capacity to generate shots preventing HPV and other illnesses is certainly a possibility - but due to geography (or national origin) this technological innovation is not available to everyone. Society is affected by this disparity because Proxy-Connection: keep-alive Cache-Control: max-age=0 ople mate without specific regard to geograhy/class. As a result, all heterosexual couples are equally affected by sexual health even those who did/did not get the guardasil shot or those whose partner is or is not circumsized.

See Full Review » (9 answers)
Katie Sells
3.1
by Katie Sells - Feb. 22, 2011

Society and the male's parents bear the responsibility of maintaining good health by encouraging male circumcision. By studying the link between circumcision and HPV (cervical cancer), doctors and parents can now have more medical backing behind the importance of circumcision and, by circumcising boys, can decrease the risk of HPV in in their future female partners.

See Full Review » (4 answers)
Brooke Davis
by Brooke Davis - Jan. 18, 2011

Parents, in particular parents of boys bear the burden of responsibility for good health in this article. The article explains the benefits and possible life saving precautions of circumcision in boys and men as a possible prevention of AIDS along with sexually transmitted diseases. Society expects those with incurable infectious diseases to take any precaution and use any prevention strategy possible in hopes of protecting the general public. When studies come out providing ways of possible prevention medicine begins to play a huge role in the societal expectations of overall good public health. Society expects everyone to take any precaution possible to promote good public health which in this article would be male ... More »

See Full Review » (1 answer)

Comments on this story (2)Help (BETA)

NT Rating | My Rating

Ratings

3.7

Good
from 10 reviews (14% confidence)
Quality
3.7
Facts
3.9
Fairness
3.9
Information
3.0
Insight
3.0
Sourcing
3.2
Style
3.8
Accuracy
4.0
Balance
3.0
Context
4.0
Depth
3.2
Enterprise
3.8
Expertise
3.0
Originality
4.0
Relevance
4.2
Transparency
4.0
Responsibility
4.0
Popularity
3.8
Recommendation
4.0
Credibility
3.3
# Reviews
5.0
# Views
5.0
# Likes
1.0
# Emails
1.0
More
How our ratings work »
(See these related stories.)

Links Help

No links yet. Please review this story to add some!