As cholera worsens, violence breaks out in Haiti

Protesters set fire to a police station and clash with UN forces as the cholera death toll grows.

Anger over the cholera outbreak led to violent demonstrations today as protesters set fire to a police station and clashed with U.N. forces in Cap-Haitien, a city on the north coast. One protester was killed. Many Haitians blame a Nepalese U.N. contingent for causing the outbreak when sewage from their camp leaked into the Artibonite. Full Story »

Posted by Jon Mitchell - via Slatest, GlobalPost
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Posted by: Posted by Jon Mitchell - Nov 16, 2010 - 6:28 AM PST
Content Type: Article
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Edited by: Jon Mitchell - Nov 16, 2010 - 8:18 AM PST

Reviews

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Jon Mitchell
4.0
by Jon Mitchell - Nov. 16, 2010

This report successfully blends personal, human reporting with concision, clarity, and information. It reports the local assertion that a Nepalese U.N. camp is the source of the outbreak, but it doesn't accept that claim out of hand. The report concentrates mostly on the what-do-we-do-now of the story.

See Full Review » (10 answers)
Alan Franciose
3.4
by Alan Franciose - Nov. 17, 2010

While this is an important issue that needs to be covered, more information on how this issue can be solved would have helped this article.

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Rebecca Solomon
3.9
by Rebecca Solomon - Nov. 17, 2010

Haiti has been plagued with so much tragedy in recent years that I can only imagine the difficulty that journalists encounter when keeping their stories about Haiti fresh and relevant to the public. Still, author Ezra Fieser managed to capture my interest. She writes with a sense of ease and urgency that catches the readers attention.

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Eric Allen
3.1
by Eric Allen - Nov. 17, 2010

I think the story needs more context, like information about cholera outbreaks around the world, and previous outbreaks in Haiti. Also, I think the information about cholera should be higher up in the story, and there should be more statistics about cholera. It also would have been nice to hear about other possible sources of the cholera outbreak, instead of the one rumor about the outbreak coming from the sewage leak.

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Jin Bae
3.3
by Jin Bae - Dec. 1, 2010

News about cholera in Haiti is common, and quite repetitive, but I think that Ezra Fieser did a good job of putting something new onto the table. Besides just stating statistical information and emphasizing the deadly impact of the disease, Fieser incorporates the voices of several victims, which really liven up the article. Before going into each quote, she uses anecdotal and descriptive transitions. By simply using this transitional technique, the readers are able to feel those who have been affected by cholera, both emotionally and physically. Overall, this is a well-written and interesting article that is supported by strong evidence.

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Lauryn Paiva
4.6
by Lauryn Paiva - Nov. 17, 2010

This article encompassed both factual and anecdotal reporting. While it could go into greater depth, it covers the story's most essential information effectively. And, it meets the Who cares? threshold for an audience that might struggle to relate to a story about a disease that doesn't affect Americans in a place far away.

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Katie Sells
by Katie Sells - Feb. 3, 2011

This story does a great job at looking at the issue from an unbias perspective. There are no direct stereotypes presented in the article, mainly because the journalist who wrote it did a god job interviewing multiple sources on the issue of cholera in Haiti. He did not limit his sources to just doctors and health professionals but he went into the community and heard about cholera from the people its affecting.

See Full Review » (1 answer)

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