Michael Phelps, marijuana, feigned outrage

America is a place where you can destroy millions of lives as a Wall Street executive and still get invited for photo ops at the White House; a land where the Everyman icon -- Joe Six-pack -- is named for his love of shotgunning two quarts of beer at holiday gatherings; a "shining city on a hill" where presidential candidates' previous abuse of alcohol and cocaine is portrayed as positive proof of grittiness and character. And yet, somehow, Phelps is the ... Full Story »

Posted by Dwight Rousu
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Subjects: U.S., Business, Media, Health
Member Tags: pot, American Drug War
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Posted by: Posted by Dwight Rousu - Feb 16, 2009 - 12:55 AM PST
Edit Lock: This story can be edited
Edited by: Kaizar Campwala - Feb 16, 2009 - 12:55 PM PST
Kaizar Campwala
3.1
by Kaizar Campwala - Feb. 16, 2009

Nothing particularly new or interesting in this opinion piece.

See Full Review » (11 answers)
Norman Farrell
4.2
by Norman Farrell - Feb. 16, 2009

Sirota states what most thoughtful people know to be true. The thing most dangerous about cannabis is its illegality. Because tens of millions use the weed, outrage involving Olympic hero Michael Phelps can only be fake. Countless other examples show how media is fascinated by the meaningless. They deliver the stories but readers and viewers are the real hypocrites.

We can witness collective tragedy with little reaction. Bomb 300 wedding guest by mistake - sorry. If a Ponzi operator commits multi-billion dollar fraud against pensions, it's news for a few days. However, when a youth smokes a joint, we get angry and demand he pay a price.

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Dwight Rousu
3.5
by Dwight Rousu - Feb. 16, 2009

The article is good pushback against the demonization of Phelps, and looking instead at the hypocritical views of pot.

America's drug policy is idiotic.

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Kenneth Sibbett
3.0
by Kenneth Sibbett - Feb. 16, 2009

While this was a big deal with the media, all I heard was a few jokes.This was a non-story then and a non-story now.

One thing the author does bring up is the draconian drug laws in this country. With state after state spending billions of dollars to build prison after prison to keep people that did nothing more than the people who sent them there did in their youth.

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Elizabeth White-Nadler
3.9
by Elizabeth White-Nadler - Feb. 16, 2009

As an opinion piece, this is very successful. Sirota uses a tone that is at once amusing and pointed, encouraging readers to laugh at themselves and also take a closer look at our group behavior. Of course, it will not appeal to those who disagree with Sirota, but "preaching to the choir" will be well received among those who share his sentiment.

See Full Review » (6 answers)
Tanya J. Maurer
3.8
by Tanya J. Maurer - Feb. 18, 2009

Rick Steves has generated some good information on this topic.

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