The End of Journalism As We Knew It

Doesn't journalism require that you who produce our daily paper tell the truth about who brought us to a position where the only way to keep confidence in our economy was a $700 billion bailout? Aren't you supposed to follow the money and see which politicians were benefiting personally from the deregulation of mortgage lending? Full Story »

Posted by Kelly Garrett
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Subjects: U.S., Politics, Business, Media
Member Tags: credit crisis
Editorial Help
Posted by: Posted by Kelly Garrett - Oct 22, 2008 - 6:39 AM PDT
Edit Lock: This story can be edited
Edited by: Fabrice Florin - Oct 24, 2008 - 10:44 AM PDT

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Fabrice Florin
2.4
by Fabrice Florin - Oct. 24, 2008

Shallow opinion piece by PowerLine blogger John Hinderaker, quoting Orson Scott Card, about his assertion that democrats and journalists are to blame for the housing crisis, not the Bush Administration. Neither author attempts to fairly present opposing viewpoints, and both present their own opinions as if they were facts. That said, it's likely that both Democrats and Republicans played a role in enabling the mortgage crisis. But I cannot condone the author's suggestion that mainstream media are "the public relations machine of the Democratic Party." No factual evidence is provided to support that claim, which doesn't match my understanding of the real world.

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Paul Belle-Isle
1.5
by Paul Belle-Isle - Oct. 24, 2008

This is not objective journalism; it is a blog post citing an opinion piece by a science fiction author. Further, the central GOP talking point that makes up the post - that loaning to poor people caused the financial crisis is transparently false. The collateralized debt market totals out at $62 trillion, and is a direct product of deregulation led by former Republican Senator Phil Gramm and the GOP. This market is the root of the meltdown, and it absolutely dwarfs the "mere" billions lent to people of lower income. (Who, by the way, tend to default at lower rates than higher income borrowers in the housing market.) In essence, the collateralized debt market crisis resulted from institutions making bad loans ... More »

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Kelly Garrett
3.1
by Kelly Garrett - Oct. 22, 2008
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Jacob Listerud
3.6
by Jacob Listerud - Feb. 4, 2010

I think this might be quality journalism, because it states out that we should keep journalism alive, and if we don't do something fast, how else would the news be given out?

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