How to Get Fewer Scientists

President Bush told cancer researchers gathered at the National Institutes of Health in January that we need to "make sure that our scientists are given the tools and encourage young kids to become scientists in the first place." Yet his administration's stingy NIH budgets over the past five years and its threat last week to veto the appropriations bill giving the NIH a small funding boost sound more like components of a Discourage Future Scientists Act. Full Story »

Posted by Melva Hackney

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Francis Scalzi
4.7
by Francis Scalzi - Oct. 1, 2008

While I rarely wish to reply to reviews made by respondents to these media reports, I feel compelled to state that the comment by Mr. David Starr (July 24, 1 2007, above on this page) is utterly without merit. Or to put it more bluntly, Mr. Starr doesn't have the slightest idea of what he's talking about. As a chemist and biochemist who has worked both in industry and has retired from a long career in academe, along with regular contacts with government research institutes such as NIH, I may attest from long term experience that the work done at NIH and our universities is the life blood of research and science in the USA, particularly in the biomedical area. It is true that drug research is dominated by private pharmaceutical firms, but often in collaboration with government facilities and universities as well as the medical community. These same drug firms also receive generous financial incentives from the government, most particularly now from the Bush administration. The article is accurate, well researched, and speaks to a profound lack of appreciation of the fututre of science in the USA - - on all fronts, academe, industry, and government facilities. Sorry, but Mr. Starr is full of baloney.

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